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knightarcana:

fuckyeahplussizealternatives:

toomanyfandomssolittletime:

maahammy:

jadethemerman:

July 28th, 2014: Out and about in New York City

How problematic

im gonna fuckin throw up

Okay, okay calm down, people.

While you are all losing your mind over ‘cultural appropriation” of an Indian dress, nobody actually consulted THE INDIANS. 

In our country, if a foreigner wears an Indian saree, we actually appreciate it. It shows that the foreigner respects us enough to try our clothes. And the saree, mind you, is not a religious thing. Hindus can wear sarees, Muslims can wear sarees, Sikh’s can wear sarees, Jain’s can wear sarees and so on.

Like Americans have short dresses, compare that with sarees. Going to a party? Saree. Going to temple? Saree, and so on.

Some Indians wear it, some don’t. Some hate it and think its oppressing, some love embracing the unique style.

Point is, don’t hate on her for wearing this. Don’t hate on anyone for wearing sarees or any variations of sarees. We love to see others embracing our culture. Why do you think we open our gates to allow everyone to practice yoga and find spiritual meaning?

Culture is not meant to be kept within four walls, it should be spread.

I did not know this. That is really interesting to find out. Thanks for the information.

"Culture is not meant to be kept within four walls, it should be spread."

i’d just like to point out that one person doesn’t speak for all indians everywhere we don’t have a hive mind or anything - that said, i think if you live in a country where your culture is alive and part of the mainstream like india (or even singapore where we’re a minority but mostly still keep and practice the culture) then some white woman in america wearing a saree isn’t really going to make a difference, because it doesn’t affect our lives in any way (i’ve brought white friends to buy sarees before, it’s not an issue). but it might be different if you live in a country where you are part of a minority culture that’s either ignored or very often mocked or considered “foreign”, and to see people appropriating a culture that they otherwise have no interest in, and then to have to live in a society that devalues that very culture. yeah, i’d be offended too, maybe.

i also side-eye the white people who are reblogging this and going OMG INDIANS APPROVE OF US WEARING SAREES WE’RE NOT DOING ANYTHING WRONG WHOO GO US. please, sit down. 

(Source: ladyxgaga, via trottingthefox)

(Source: buckysbarnes, via thestreetballet)

phantom-killer-hiou:

My cute piggies have nice trip
To my grandmas garden :)
They have so much fun outside.

(via guineapiggies)

katemonkeyville:

lettersfromtitan:

sushigrade:

Just watch it, dammit

This is absolutely worth 19 seconds of your life.

And everyone who was a stupid teenager in the 90s suddenly can’t stop laughing.

(Source: videohall)

marvel: [has a black man walk in the background of the shot of the 6 white avengers]
marvel fandom: REPRESENTATION.
marvel fandom: DO YOU SEE THAT.
marvel fandom: DC, WHERE YOU AT.
marvel fandom: YOUR MOVE, DC.
marvel fandom: ON YOUR LEFT, DC.

afirethatwillneverburn:

steppauseturnpausepivotstepstep:

babybutta:

yarrahs-life:

high-power-prolific:

thehereticpharaoh:

People really don’t believe Ancient Egyptians were ethnically African?

They referred to themselves, not as ”Egyptians” (a Greek term) , but as ”Kemmui’’, meaning, ”the blacks”.

The country itself they called, Kemet, or black nation.

'Kem' is the term for black in the ancient Egyptian language. It is represented in hieroglyphs by a stick charred at both ends.”

"km.t, the name of Ancient Egypt in Egyptian; Egypt (Coptic: Kemi)

r n km.t, the native term for the Egyptian language

(Ref: The Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vols 1&2, E.A. Budge, Dover.) 

Note: words inside brackets are the determinatives or word classifiers along with their English meanings.

Kem, kame, kmi, kmem, kmom = to be black 

Kememu = Black people (Ancient Egyptians) in both Ancient and modern Egyptian (Kmemou).

Kem [khet][wood] = extremely black, jet-black

Kemet = any black thing. Note: “t” is silent - pronounced Kemé

Kemet [nu][community, settlement, nation] = Black nation = Ancient Egypt.  

Kemet [Romé][people] = Black people. Ancient Egyptians. 

Kemit [Shoit][books] = Black books, Ancient Egyptian literature.  

Kem wer [miri][large body of water] = The Great Black sea (The Red sea). This sea is neither black nor red, this is in reference to which nation, Black or Red, at a particular time, controlled this body of water. 

Kemi fer = Black double house; seat of government. Note: by reference to Wolof again, we know that to make a plural of per or house, the “p” becomes an “f” or fer. Thus fero=great houses (double), it is not pero as Budge writes.

In Ancient Egyptian, the ordinary adjective always follows the noun it modifies, whereas a sanctified adjective usually comes before its noun.  The sanctified adjectives are:

Kem —  Black

Suten -  Royal

Nter —-  Holy, Sacred

Examples:

Kem ti = Black image, sacred image : ti oubash = white image  

Kem ho = Black face/title of a god   : ho oubash = white face  

Kem ta = Black land, holy land        : Ta deshret = Red land (also; Ta Sett) 

This rule does not apply when Black is used as a noun-adjective of nationality:  

Hompt Kemet = copper of Black; Egyptian copper :  Hompt Sett = copper of the Red nations; Asiatic copper  

Ro in Kemet (page 416a) = speech of Black; mute ro n Kemet = word of the mouth of Black; the Egyptian language

Kemet Deshret = Black and Red; good and evil; fertile and barren, etc.; Duality  

Deshretu (page 554a,b) = red ones, red devils.  Used also to refer to the Namu and Tamhu; not a complimentary label. 

African Origins: 

The following Ancient Egyptian words acknowledge the origins of Pharaonic Egyptian civilization; 

Khentu Hon Nefer (page 554a) = founders of the Excellent Order. Budge: “peoples and tribes of Nubia and the Egyptian Sudan.” For “Hon” see page 586b. 

Hon Nefer (page 1024b) = Excellent Order

Kenus (page1024b) = mighty; brave (from Kenu, page 772a)

Ta Khent (page 1051b/page 554b) = land of the beginning.  

Eau (page 952b/page 17b) = the old country  

Ancient Egyptian’s Worldview:  

The Egyptian’s view of the world was the exact opposite of the current Western one. To the Egyptian, the top of the world was in the south (upper) towards the African interior, the bottom (lower) towards the north, hence upper and lower Egypt; upper and lower Syria.”

"Oh yes, the black soil business.

Most scholars outside the modern western cover-up establishment have rejected the false interpretation some have given to Kemet, ostensibly alluding the term Kemet to the alleged ”black soil”  of Egypt. There’s nothing in the term, outside the imagination of western myth-makers,  to suggest the Egyptians referred to the color of the soil or sand, rather than the people, in naming their country. Our position is consistent with the testimony of the ancient Greek writers, eyewitnesses who unanimously described the Egyptians as a black people, closely related to the ”Ethiopians”.”

And white Hollywood casts white actors and gives them tans.

*internal sobbing*

i will never not reblog this. i know too many people who for real dont think Egypt is a part of Africa.

My only thing here is that at least part of the reason we think the Egyptians believed the world was opposite of the way we do — north was south/south was north etc — was because the Nile flows south to north. 

Apart from that very nitpicky little thing — yeah you have no idea how much this grates my nerves

(via paradoxmagic)

styleofdress:

because i hate it when people post these without recipes, here are all of them. some of these aren’t EXACTLY the same, but they’re close enough to still be delicious.

triple layer brownie cake / cherry bliss brownie / chocolate truffle layer cake / snickers peanut butter brownie ice cream cake / surprise inside ice cream balls / chocolate filled cream puffs / brownie cookies / chocolate snickers cake / chocolate lasagna / double chocolate brownies

(Source: shams94, via kimmsauce)